Growth and yield promoting effect of artificial mycorrhization combined with different fertiliser rates on field-grown tomato

  • Vincenzo Candido School of Agricultural, Forest, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Basilicata, Potenza, Italy.
  • Gabriele Campanelli Agricultural Research Council, Research Unit for Vegetable Crops in Central Areas (CRAORA), Monsampolo del Tronto (AP), Italy.
  • Trifone D'Addabbo | t.daddabbo@ba.ipp.cnr.it Institute for Plant Protection (IPP), National Research Council, Bari, Italy.
  • Donato Castronuovo School of Agricultural, Forest, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Basilicata, Potenza, Italy.
  • Marek Renco Parasitological Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice, Slovakia.
  • Ippolito Camele School of Agricultural, Forest, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Basilicata, Potenza, .

Abstract

Combination of plant inoculation with a commercial mycorrhizal formulation with half or full fertiliser application rates was evaluated for the effects on plant growth and yield and mycorrhization occurrence throughout two consecutive field tomato crops in southern Italy. Mycorrhizal formulation was inoculated on tomato seedling roots both in the nursery and after transplant. Inoculated tomato seedlings were significantly larger than non-inoculated seedlings less than 30 days after the first inoculation in the nursery. Above ground dry biomass and stem number of inoculated plants were found to be higher also at the end of each crop. Positive effects of mycorrhizal inoculation were extended also to marketable yield of both crops, mainly due to an increased number and weight of clusters and fruits. Mycorrhizal treatment also improved crop earliness, seen in terms of anticipating plant flowering, increasing first harvest yield, and reducing average harvesting time compared to non-inoculated plants. Both rates of mineral fertilisers positively affected tomato growth and marketable yield, but did not influence fruit quality parameters. No significant interaction was found between mineral fertilisation and plant mycorrhization. Crop inoculation with mycorrhizal formulations could reduce the amounts of fertilisers and pesticides being used, and could represent a sustainable technique to improve crop yield and profitability.

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Author Biographies

Vincenzo Candido, School of Agricultural, Forest, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Basilicata, Potenza
Associate Professor
Gabriele Campanelli, Agricultural Research Council, Research Unit for Vegetable Crops in Central Areas (CRAORA), Monsampolo del Tronto (AP)

Researcher

Trifone D'Addabbo, Institute for Plant Protection (IPP), National Research Council, Bari
Researcher
Donato Castronuovo, School of Agricultural, Forest, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Basilicata, Potenza
Technician
Marek Renco, Parasitological Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice
Researcher
Ippolito Camele, School of Agricultural, Forest, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Basilicata, Potenza
Researcher
Published
2013-09-09
Section
Original Articles
Keywords:
arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, fertilisers, yield, mycorrhizal, plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria, tomato.
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How to Cite
Candido, V., Campanelli, G., D’Addabbo, T., Castronuovo, D., Renco, M., & Camele, I. (2013). Growth and yield promoting effect of artificial mycorrhization combined with different fertiliser rates on field-grown tomato. Italian Journal of Agronomy, 8(3), e22. https://doi.org/10.4081/ija.2013.e22

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